Hypericum perforatum

Names

Names

Scientific: Hypericum perforatum

English: St. John’s Wort

Portuguese: Erva de S. João

Origins

Origins

Family: Hypericaceae

Origin: Europe

Life Cycle: Annual

Properties

Properties

Aroma
Medicinal
Edibility

Parts Used

Parts Used

See Here
01-Hypericum-perforatum 02-Hypericum-perforatum 03-Hypericum-perforatum 04-Hypericum-perforatum 05-Hypericum-perforatum 06-Hypericum-perforatum 07-Hypericum-perforatum 08-Hypericum-perforatum 09-Hypericum-perforatum 10-Hypericum-perforatum 11-Hypericum-perforatum
Scientific NameHypericum perforatum
English NameSt. John's Wort, rosin rose, goatweed, chase-devil, Klamath weed, Tipton’s weed.
Portuguese NameErva de S. João, hipericão, hipericão fêmea, hipericão-bravo, milfurada, milfurado, paparicão, pericão, piricão fêmea.
German NameEchte Johanniskraut, Echtes Johanneskraut, Echt-Johanniskraut, Gewöhnliches Johanniskraut, Durchlöchertes Johanniskraut, Tüpfel-Johanniskraut, Tüpfel-Hartheu.
FamilyHypericaceae
OriginEurope, Azores, Madeira, Southeast and Northwest Africa and Western Asia.
HabitatClearings, sun exposure and calcareous soils.
Life CycleAnnual
Preferences CultivationWell-drained soil and retain moisture in the soil, also succeeds in dry soils. Sun exposure.
Method of propagationSowing - the seeds ripen in autumn or spring. Seeds germinate between one to three months to about 10°C. The planting site should be permanent in the summer. Divisions may be in the spring or in the fall.
Ornamental CharacteristicsFlowering from May to August. H: 1 m, ᴓ 0,5 m
Description of smells and flavorsAroma similar to cabbage.
Properties MedicinalAntidepressant. The flowers and leaves have antiseptic, antispasmodic, aromatic, astringent, cholagogue (secretes bile), digestive, diuretic, expectorant, sedative, stimulant and anthelmintic analgesic properties. It is also applied in the lung and bladder problems, diarrhea, Devils and treats incontinence treatments in children. The herbal tea made from fresh flowers is commonly used for external use to treat external ulcers, burns, injuries, pain and bruising. The herbal tea made from flowers with olive oil is applied externally to wounds, ulcers, swelling and rheumatism.
Properties EdibilityUnknown
Properties OtherNone
Contraindications / Side Effects / CommentsSide effects: contact with the sap on the skin or ingestion can cause photosensitivity in some people. The most common reactions are gastrointestinal disturbances, allergic reactions and fatigue. It should not be consumed with drugs responsible for inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, it may give side effects such as hallucinations, agitation, headache, coma, chills, excessive sweating, fever, hypertension, nausea, diarrhea and tremors. This species also has properties that may reduce the effectiveness of chemical contraceptives, anti-depressants, immune suppressants prescribed for diseases such as HIV measurement. The plant was often sought by Native Americans as an abortifacient, therefore pregnant women should avoid its use.
Pests and diseases & how to fight themUnknown
How and When to harvest and / or pruning and which parts used. How many cuts per year?Parts used: leaves. Pruning: the stems of semi-ripe wood, at the foot with a height between 10 to 12 cm.
Can be used in intercropping ( repellent / attractive ) or is biopesticide?Attracts pollinators.
Curiosity / Personal ExperiencesThe species has active biochemicals such as rutin, pectin, choline, sitosterol, hypericin and pseudohypericin, and the latter two are being examined for the treatment of HIV. The wort is recommended since 2000 years ago to nervous system problems. The ancient Greek and Roman societies used the plant to treat wounds, burns, pain, bruising and nerve pain. It was common for people to make infusions to ward off evil spirits and madness.

If you found an error, highlight it and press Shift + Enter or click here to inform us.